Dawid Ciężarkiewicz aka `dpc`

Rust

This is going to be a quick overview of how I tend to write my application code. It might be a bit Rust-centric, but I apply similar methods in all programming languages I use.

I think it's an important subject and during past online discussions about learning Rust and writing code “the Rust-way”, I was asked multiple times how do I do it. I don't really have a lot of time to write something longer and better structured, so please excuse anything that is confusing. You get what you pay for.

Also, I don't want to suggest this is some sacred, best way or anything like that. I think this is what I'm typically doing. A result of years of professional and Open Source work and experiences I gained during that time. I'm always happy to learn and get to know other points of view, so I'm happy to hear any feedback.

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Test runners/frameworks caused me a lot of grief over the years. It's part of the reason why really appreciate how standard #Rust test runner works. As usual with Rust, core developers, and the community at very least avoided the most common misfeatures and made the right thing to be the easiest and most natural thing to do.

That's why i recently (probably too abrasively) bashed an announcement of some new Rust testing library.

I've taken some time and collected a list of feature request, misfeature rants, that I just want to share.

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I am a crypto-finance enthusiast and though I am strongly skewed toward Bitcoin maximalism, I still try to follow the space looking for promising technologies and ecosystems.

One of the coins that really caught my interest was Grin

  • It has no fishy business (pre-mine, dev-taxes),
  • is written in #Rust (which, I think, is a perfect language for #cryptofin),
  • it is based on MimbleWimble which is a very promising tech improving blockchain scalability.

It ticks all the boxes to be a reasonable altcoin.

The only problem with it is it's controversial monetary policy. Basically: one coin, every second, forever. While I don't mind the “forever” part, the problem with Grin's monetary policy is the steady and long initial inflation rate.

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My name is Dawid Ciężarkiewicz. Among many things, I'm a long time Open Source user and contributor, a software engineer by profession and passion.

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I think I've discovered Rust somewhere around the year 2012. Back then it was much different language than it is today. It had green-threads, @ and ~ were used a lot, and there was even a GC.

Rust caught my attention because I was looking for a language for myself. I always considered myself “a C guy”: a bottom-up developer, that first learned machine code, then learned higher level programming. And while C was my language of choice, I couldn't stand it anymore.

I was tired of how difficult it was to write a correct, robust software in C, especially:

  • inability to create solid abstractions and nice APIs,
  • segfaults, double checking my pointers and general lack of trust in my code,
  • make and make-likes building system.

I loved the simplicity and minimalism, I loved the flexibility and control, but I couldn't stand primitivism and lack of modern features.

With time I grew more and more fond of Rust. The language kept evolving in a direction that was my personal sweet spot: a modern C. And at some point I realized I'm in love with Rust. And I still am today, after a couple of years of using it.

Just look at my github profile. It has “Rust” written all over it. And check how my contributions grew since 2013. Rust made me much more productive and enthusiastic about programming.

So let me tell you why is Rust my darling programming language.

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